Charles Sturt University – Wine Tasting

Hi Everyone, well over the weekend, while attending Code Camp Oz 2008 in Wagga Wagga I had a chance to taste some of the wine from Charles Sturt University.

On offer was the 2003 Limited Release Cabernet Sauvignon, their current vintage Port and a white which I admittedly didn’t taste.

The Cabernet was a tad bit too soft for my tastes, felt like the acidity wasn’t balanced enough – i.e. not enough to balance the wine, it felt flat.

However, by contrast the Port was quite nice. Not Galway Pipe Port, but not a bad substitute. It didn’t have the large punch that you sometimes get with the larger ports, but this was a more silky port, easy to drink.

We opened a bottle of Bordeaux last week before I headed off to Sydney, so I’ll have to write about it later in the week. For now, happy quaffing..

2007 Anniversary Wine – 2002 Henschke Hill of Grace

Hill of Grace In 2007 we had to make a tough choice between the outstanding 2002 Penfolds Grange and the 2002 Henschke Hill of Grace

Having tasted a variety of previous vintages of both labels, we had decided it was too close to call.  In the end, price was the deciding factor as we were able to acquire a 2002 Hill of Grace for slightly less than a Grange.

The wine is grown in Eden valley in South Australia by generations of the Henschke family.  From the official site, the following description describes the location and the history behind the name:

“Hill of Grace: this surely is one of the most evocative phrases in the world of wine. It is a translation from the German ‘Gnadenberg’, a region in Silesia, and the name given to the lovely Lutheran Church across the road.

For Henschke it is the name of both the vineyard and the wine that has so captured the heart of the red wine lover. The 8ha single vineyard on the original 32ha block sits at an altitude of 400m, and has an average rainfall of 520mm. It is situated at Parrot Hill, an isolated spot that was once an active village.”

Also from the official site, the vines planted in the vineyard are as follows:

“Shiraz (on own roots) – vines originate from pre-phylloxera material brought from Europe by the early European settlers; riesling, semillon, mataro”

Which means that the original vines come from the mid 19th century and could be considered amongst some of the oldest in the world, since Australia was never affected by the nasty strain of phylloxera which ravaged vines in Europe and North America.

Wine Reviews and Tasting